Safety Smart Compliance

Toolbox

 

Safety Smart Compliance delivers hundreds of useful tools that will save you both time and money, while also ensuring that your business is compliant with the latest laws and regulations in your area and/or industry.

To access a tool:

1. Pick either the topic or tool type you are interested in from the dropdown below, and

2. Select the tool you want from the list created

Use this policy to protect young workers utilizing OSHA guidance and best practices.

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Adapt this Safety Policy if your workers work on or near overhead power lines.

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Respirators on a hot day can add to heat stress dangers. So what should you do?

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To prevent heat stress you must measure not just heat and humidity but thermal comfort.

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Although it may sound like a contradiction in terms, wearing PPE can be vital to warding off heat stress.

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Here’s a Glossary listing OSHA’s definitions of the key terms in the Bloodborne Pathogens Standard.

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Date: Thursday, April 11th Time: 12:00 EST (9 a.m. PST) Duration: 90 Minutes

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Make no mistake: bringing your organization into compliance with the revisions to the Hazard Communication Standard will require your organization to make major changes to your current Hazard Communication Program including:
  • Revising your hazardous chemicals inventory to reflect hazardous substance re-classification
  • Converting from MSDSs to new safety data sheets
  • Trading your old HAZCOM labels to the new “harmonized” ones
  • Training employees to use the new SDSs and labeling system
.. and that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Changes to your Hazard Communication Program will also

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Near miss incidents give you a chance to identify and fix problems with your health and safety program before they do real injury or property damage.

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Here’s a self-assessment Checklist you can use to determine if you comply with current OSHA sanitation and housekeeping rules.

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Prevent ladder accidents and OSHA citations by adopting this ladder use policy for your own site.

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Making sure you replace MSDSs with SDSs: What to do and when.

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RESPIRATORY PROTECTION If there are chemicals (gases or vapors) or particulates present in the air that are harmful to employees when inhaled, you must provide a barrier to them. As with the evaluation of noise levels, special monitoring equipment is needed to determine the level of airborne contamination and how it compares to established exposure levels.  As is also the case with noise levels, it is up to you to “prove the negative”—that the levels are not harmful. Unless you have documentation otherwise, you could be in violation of OSHA Standards.
There are many options for protecting employees from airborne contamination, from

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An average of 30 workers die on the job each year as a result of heat stroke. Here is a 9 step gameplan for protecting workers and avoiding liability.

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BENEFITS

Although it might enhance productivity, allowing workers to talk on cell phones or text while driving in carrying out their jobs is arguably an OSHA violation; encouraging or requiring them to do so is definitely a violation. That’s why OSHA, DOT, NHTSA and other agencies have called on employers to ban workers from this practice. This tool will enable you to keep your workers safe and avoid any OSHA citations.

HOW TO USE THIS TOOL

Here’s a Model Policy that you can use to ban cell phone use and texting by workers who drive. This Policy comes from the

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The article How to Contest an OSHA Violation sketches out the steps to follow to contest an OSHA citation. Of course, all of this begs a big question: Should you even bother to make the effort? To Challenge Or Not To Challenge The decision about whether to contest an OSHA citation is one employers need to approach with care and deliberation. Contesting an OSHA citation isn't easy. It takes time, money and effort. And success is far from guaranteed. Too many employers rush into a contest without fully understanding what's involved. But damned-if-you-don’t may also apply. Failing to challenge an

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What you will and won’t need to change and when

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One of the key aspects of the OSHA Final GHS Rule that you need to know about are the changes to workplace label requirements. Here’s a quick overview of the changes and when you must comply with them. Click here for a step-by-step gameplan for complying with label requirements—both current and under GHS

HOW GHS CHANGES LABEL REQUIREMENTS

Under GHS, workplace labels will continue to play a crucial role in communicating information about hazardous chemicals to workers. Who Creates Workplace Labels As under current rules, the company that manufactures or imports the chemical must create the workplace label and ensure it’s properly

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BENEFITS Although safety training is a general requirement, a few OSHA standards set out specific requirements governing the content and delivery of training. One of these is the Powered Industrial Trucks standard. It’s essential to comply with each of the specific requirements to avoid not just OSHA citations but potential forklift-related injuries and property damage. This tool will allow you to do both. HOW TO USE THE TOOL The Model Checklist incorporates the elements of operator training required by the standard. Part 1 of the Checklist covers topics related to the equipment itself, such as operating instructions. Part 2 covers conditions in the

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Retrieved from: American Industrial Hygiene Association   The American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA), as a result of its biennial membership survey, projects the top public policy issues of concern to AIHA members and the occupational and environmental health and safety (OEHS) profession over the next two years. The 2009-2010 survey was divided into various categories. While providing results for the highest ranking issues in each category, AIHA has also identified the overall top public policy issues for the association in

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This instruction describes a Federal Program Change which impacts State programs.

1. The Regional Administrator (RA) shall ensure that this change is promptly forwarded to each State designee using a format consistent with the Plan Change Two-way Memorandum in Appendix A, Part I, State Plan Policies and Procedures Manual (SPM).

Read More . .

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Retrieved from: Occupational Safety & Health Administration   Suffocation from engulfment is a leading cause of death in grain bins, and the number of these deaths continue to rise. In fact, the number of such deaths more than doubled between 2006 and 2010. These fatalities are preventable if employers follow work practices and provide training and equipment as required by OSHA’s Grain Handling Facilities standard, 29 CFR

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Retrieved from: American Industrial Hygiene Association   Typically, two Deputy Assistant Secretaries of OSHA are appointed. One Deputy Assistant Secretary serves as the political person, and this is the position to which Barab has been appointed. This position does not require Senate confirmation. Barab will assume the duties of Acting Assistant Secretary until an Assistant Secretary is and confirmed, which suggests that the administration is nowhere close to nominating someone to serve as head of

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Retrieved from: Occupational Safety & Health Administration

 

Thank you for your letter of June 13, regarding the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements for guarding points of operation (29 CFR 1910.212) and belts (29 CFR 1910.219) on heavy duty (technical or industrial fabric) sewing machines.

The Department of Labor, even prior to the establishment of OSHA, has been involved with the problems of what constitutes the necessary and appropriate safeguarding of machines. The applicable standard [29 CFR 1910.212(a)(1)], which was adopted by OSHA from the standards promulgated under the Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act (41 U.S.C. 35 Et seq), requires

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Retrieved from: Occupational Safety & Health Administration

 

Your letter raises specific questions regarding the application of the Control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout) standard, 29 CFR 1910.147, in the printing industry. This response will comment on OSHA's September 16, 1992 letter to John Runyan and the June 14, 1993 follow-up memorandum to OSHA Regional Administrators. This background, your questions, and our replies follow. 

Application of the Lockout/Tagout Standard. The lockout/tagout standard applies to servicing and maintenance performed on numerous machines and pieces of equipment in an array of industries, including the printing industry. Servicing and maintenance activities are necessary adjuncts to

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Retrieved from: Occupational Safety & Health Administration

 

Thank you for your September 6th letter to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Directorate of Enforcement Programs (DEP). You had concerns regarding machine guarding and the potential enforcement of international consensus standards, such as the International Standards Organization/International Electrotechnical Commission (ISO/IEC) standards adopted under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT); and information concerning the National Emphasis Program on Amputations. 

In the United States, employers must comply with the occupational safety and health requirements issued under the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act of 1970. Specific OSHA requirements concerning

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Retrieved from: Occupational Safety & Health Administration

We have received the inquiries you directed to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Assistant Regional Administrators, regarding your company's system for providing businesses with access to Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) required by OSHA's Hazard Communication Standard (HCS). The following is submitted in response. For the purpose of clarity, I have paraphrased your questions to address the system you described.

  1. As a broad answer to your first question, OSHA inspectors follow the guidance outlined in our compliance directive, [CPL 2-2.38D] (which is enclosed for your information), during an inspection. In addition to this

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Retrieved from: Occupational Safety & Health Administration

 

This is in response to your December 15, 2004, correspondence to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) Directorate of Enforcement Programs. This letter constitutes OSHA's interpretation of only the requirements discussed and may not be applicable to any questions not delineated within your original correspondence. Your letter requested clarification regarding OSHA's Hazard Communication Standard (HCS), 29 CFR 1910.1200. You specifically asked about requirements for maintaining Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) for coal. Your paraphrased question and our response are below. 

Question: My client utilizes coal as a fuel source for

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This video, developed for Pacific Northwest logging, discusses the basics of safe tree falling including saw cuts. University of Idaho, 1992

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Restaurants and other eating and drinking businesses employ 11.6 million people in the United States. Nearly 30% of these employees are under 20 years of age. Many teens' first work experience is in the restaurant industry. OSHA is providing this eTool to help youth working in the restaurant industry to be safe and healthy on the

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The Benefits The hardhat protects the most important and most fragile structure in the human body - the brain. Every movement made by the body is dependent on some area of the brain. Even a slight injury can have a crippling effect on the body or the mind. This handout will assist you in educating your employees about the importance of head protection, thus preventing any unnecessary accidents. How to Use this Tool Use this handout to support your own safety talk, and keep your employees in the know about this

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If everyone takes some small steps we can all make great strides. Review your environmental lifestyle:

  • Tour your home and property and see where you are wasting resources such as water and power. Determine where you are causing pollution to the air and the water.
  • Review your transportation methods and your hobbies. See how you could do better.
  • Talk to your children about their attitudes toward the environment. See how you could influence them to be more environmentally aware.
Household recycling tips:
  • Put

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Here’s a rundown of the state child labor certification requirement in each of the 50 states.

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Here’s a Checklist of the non-agricultural occupations that kids ages 14 and 15 may not engage in.

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Here’s a checklist of the non-agricultural occupations that kids ages 14 and 15 are allowed to engage in.

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Use this checklist to make sure your safety orientation delivers all the key information to young workers.

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A 23-year-old worker at a company that produces concrete and brick pavers, masonry and retaining walls, died after becoming caught in a concrete mixer.

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A 19-year-old immigrant from Mexico died from heat stress on the job in Fort Worth, TX, where he reportedly never saw a paycheck.

With less than $5 in his pocket, Faustino Varela collapsed in the heat at a construction site where he was working as a laborer. Evidence indicates that Varela was an illegal immigrant who had only been in the US for a few weeks.

Witnesses stated that Varela was complaining of feeling ill on the job, where the temperature was about 100F (38C). He

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The Benefits People who work regularly in noisy environments believe they "get used to" the noise. But if the noise is bothering them less, that's a sure sign of hearing loss. This safety talk handout can be used as an aid to develop your safety talk and ensure your workers understand the importance of hearing protection and recognizing the signs of early hearing loss/damage. How to Use this Tool Give this handout to your workers during your safety talk so they are better able to follow your message and have the essential information to take with them for

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Polls

OSHA has argued that safety programs that offer incentives/rewards are inherently flawed. What do you think?

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