Rockingham County, N.H., employer faces $44,500 in fines from U.S. Department of Labor’s OSHA

Date First Published on SafetySmart Compliance: January 23rd, 2009
Topics: Power Tools | PPE |

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited A.P. Dailey Custom Laminating Inc. of Windham, N.H., for 34 alleged serious violations of workplace safety and health standards. The manufacturer of custom kitchen cabinets and countertops faces a total of $44,500 in proposed fines following OSHA inspections prompted by an Aug. 1, 2008, accident in which a company employee lost two fingers while operating an unguarded saw.

“These citations highlight a cross-section of mechanical, chemical, electrical, health and fire hazards that need to be addressed promptly, completely and effectively,” said Rosemarie Ohar, OSHA’s area director for New Hampshire. “Failure to correct these conditions exposes employees to the dangers of fire, explosion, laceration, crushing, eye injuries and hazardous substances.”

In connection with the accident, OSHA found that the saw used by the employee, as well as other saws in the workplace, lacked guarding to prevent employee contact with their blades. The inspection also identified deficiencies in required safeguards for employees who responded to and cleaned up blood after the accident, including lack of an exposure control plan to eliminate or minimize employees’ exposure to bloodborne pathogens, lack of employee training, not offering the Hepatitis B vaccine to exposed employees and failure to disinfect surfaces contaminated with blood.

OSHA also cited the company for hazards related to the design, construction and location of its dust collection system; unguarded machinery; not training employees in the operation of fork trucks and in fire extinguisher use; lack of eye, face and hand protection; unapproved electrical installations in areas with flammable or combustible materials and liquids; lack of a written respiratory protection program and deficiencies in respirator selection, use, storage, maintenance and training; unlabeled containers of hazardous chemicals; and no exposure determination, protective clothing, eyewash and hazard information for employees working with methylene chloride.

Source: OSHA Regional News Release

[fbcomments]