Compliance Center

Fire Protection

How to Get Started

THIS SECTION IS FOR YOU regardless of what industry you're in or how big your company is as long as there are fire, combustion or explosion hazards at your workplace. The Section helps you meet OSHA requirements for exit routes, Emergency Action and Fire Prevention Plans, fire extinguishers, detection systems, protective clothing, fire brigades and training.

Articles & Insight
  • sample image 16 Things to Do to Comply with Employee Alarm Systems Rules

    Make sure your fire alarms meet OSHA standards.
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  • sample image How to Create a Fire Prevention Plan

    The OSHA Means of Egress standard (1910, Subpart E) requires employers to take steps to prepare workers to evacuate safely in the event of an emergency.
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  • sample image How to Create an Emergency Action Plan

    You can't always prevent fires and other emergencies like explosions, chemical spills, earthquakes, tornados and floods; but what you can do is prepare for them.
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  • sample image 9 Emergency Action Plan FAQs

    Make sure you comply with OSHA Emergency Action Plan requirements.
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  • sample image How to Verify and Document Fire Prevention Training

    Training is a key element of any fire response or prevention program. Too many employers assume that all they need to do to provide training is furnish appropriate training materials to workers.
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  • sample image How to Comply with Portable Fire Extinguisher Requirements

    Portable fire extinguishers are the chief weapon used by employees on the spot and internal response personnel to suppress incipient fires, fires that can still be safely extinguished without protective clothing and respiratory equipment.
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  • sample image Step 7: Air Monitoring

    Hazwoper (Sec. 1910.120(h)) requires employers to conduct air monitoring of concentrations of hazardous substances to ensure employees aren't exposed beyond PELs or published exposure levels and ensure appropriate protection. Here's an overview of what to do..
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More Articles & Insight

Time Saving Tools
  • Tool: Model Policy On Employee Emergency Alarms
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    Add this Emergency Alarms Policy to Your Emergency Preparedness Plan. Read More...

  • Fire Prevention Plan
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    The purpose of the Fire Prevention Plan is to define the University initiative to protect buildings and occupants from the hazards of fire. Read More...

  • Model Emergency Action Plan Checklist
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    Sec. 1910.38, the Emergency Action Plan standard, requires most workplaces to establish and implement an EAP. This Model Checklist will help you develop your own. Read More...

  • Model Fire Brigade Organizational Statement
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    If you use industrial fire brigades to fight fires at your workplace, you must comply with the OSHA Fire Brigades standard (Sec. 1910.156)s. Read More...

  • Portable Fire Extinguishers – Safety Talk
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    You must provide adequate training to each worker at risk of fire hazards. This tool will help you develop the most effective Safety Talk and ensure you cover the most ground. Read More...

  • Explosive Atmosphere Explained – Safety Talk
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    You must provide adequate training to each worker at risk of fire hazards. This tool will help you develop the most effective Safety Talk and ensure you cover the most ground. Read More...

Whitepapers
  • Comments on OSHA Proposed Rule on Combustible Dust The issue of protecting workers from the hazards associated with combustible dust has received increased urgency because of the 2008 explosion at a sugar refinery in Georgia that resulted in 14 worker fatalities and 60 workers seriously injured.
OSHA ENFORCEMENT & GUIDANCE
 
 
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