Compliance Center

Electricity

How to Get Started

THIS COMPLIANCE CENTER IS FOR YOU if you have electrical equipment or installations at your workplace. The COMPLIANCE CENTER helps you meet OSHA requirements for electrical protective devices, hazardous (classified) locations, safe work practices, PPE and safety training.

Articles & Insight
  • sample image How to Comply with Electrical Equipment Requirements

    Does your electrical equipment meet OSHA safety standards? Here’s how to find out.
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  • sample image How to Comply With OSHA Electrical Protective Devices Requirements

    OSHA electrical PPE requirements are contained not only in Subpart S, but as part of the PPE requirements for General Industry in Subpart I, specifically...
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  • sample image How to Comply with OSHA Hazardous (Classified) Location Requirements

    Shock and the risk of arc flash make electrical installations and equipment inherently dangerous. But putting those electrical properties...
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  • sample image 9 Ways to Verify Safety of Electrical Connections & Circuits

    Do you comply with OSHA requirements for electrical equipment safety?
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  • sample image Using the Zone Instead of the Division Classification for Class I Locations

    The article, How to Comply with OSHA Hazardous (Classified) Location Requirements explains the OSHA hazardous (classified) location system ...
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  • sample image How to Comply with "Qualified Persons" Requirements

    In the world of operations, maintenance, service and construction, employees must be "qualified" if they're going to be exposed to electrical hazards...
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  • sample image Training Workers to Avoid Electrical Dangers

    Electrocution is a leading cause of occupational deaths, according to OSHA. Electric shock also causes disabling injuries such as burns, respiratory...
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  • sample image 21 Ways to Verify Safety of Electrical Equipment Over 600 Volts

    The OSHA Electrical Standard 1910.303(b) requires you to keep electric equipment “free from recognized hazards likely to cause death or serious physical harm” to workers.
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More Articles & Insight

Time Saving Tools
  • Model Electrical Equipment Safety Policy
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    Adapt this Policy to prevent electrical injuries and OSHA citations. Read More...

  • Model Electrical Safety Policy
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    Prevent electrical shock and arc flash injuries--as well as OSHA fines fo electrical violations... Read More...

  • ELECTRICAL TRAINING CHECKLIST
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    To comply with electrical safety work practices requirements, you need to be able to distinguish between 2 groups of individuals who may work on or near electrical ... Read More...

  • EQUIPMENT USE SAFETY CHECKLIST
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    This tool applies to the use of cord and plug connected equipment, including flexible cord sets (extension cords). Read More...

  • Electrical Safety Work Permit
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    OSHA requires you to ensure that individuals working on or near energized electrical parts be "qualified" to do so and that they carry out the work in accordance with safety restrictions. Read More...

  • ELECTRICAL TRAINING CHECKLIST
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    To comply with electrical safety work practices requirements, you need to be able to distinguish between 2 groups of individuals who may work on or near electrical dangers: Qualified and Un-qualified persons. Read More...

  • Avoid Getting the Shock of Your Life – Safety Talk Handout
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    Some people have the idea that you must be working around a high voltage line to be at risk for electrocution. That's not true. Read More...

  • Model Policy for Working Safely Near Overhead Power Lines
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    Adapt this Safety Policy if your workers work on or near overhead power lines. Read More...

  • Model Policy for Working Safely Near Overhead Power Lines
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    Adapt this Safety Policy if your workers work on or near overhead power lines. Read More...

  • Safe Work Practices for Working on or Near Energized Equipment
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    Here’s a set of generic Safe Work Practices for work on or near energized equipment that meet OSHA standards that you can adapt for your own workplace. Read More...

Whitepapers
  • Circuit Breakers: Incorrectly Refurbished Circuit Breakers The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently learned of a hazardous condition that may exist in certain molded-case circuit breakers modified by a third-party rebuilder.
  • OSHA: Electrical Standards Section 6(a) of the Williams-Steiger Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (84 Stat. 1593) provides that ''without regard to chapter 5 of title 5, United States Code, or...
Enforcements
 
 
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