Special Reports

To access any of our hundreds of available whitepapers, simply click on the image or title below. At the bottom of each whitepaper page you will see a “download now” PDF icon that you can click on to read a digital version of the whitepaper or save a copy to your computer and print at your leisure.

Retrieved from: Occupational Safety & Health Administration
 
According to the 2005 National Electrical Code® (NEC), a cable tray system is “[a] unit or assembly of units or sections and associated fittings forming a structural system used to securely fasten or support cables and raceways.” Cable trays …

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Retrieved from: Occupational Safety & Health Administration
 
Electrical hazards exist in some form in nearly all occupations. However, those hazards multiply for workers involved in cleanup and recovery efforts following major disasters and weather emergencies. One particular life-threatening danger exists around downed and low-hanging electrical wires.

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Retrieved from: Occupational Safety & Health Administration
 
Electricity has long been recognized as a serious workplace hazard, exposing employees to electric shock, electrocution, burns, fires, and explosions. In 1999, for example, 278 workers died from electrocutions at work, accounting for almost 5 percent of all on-the-job …

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Retrieved from: Occupational Safety & Health Administration
 
Many workplaces contain spaces that are considered to be “confined” because their configurations hinder the activities of employees who must enter into, work in or exit from them. In many instances, employees who work in confined spaces also face …

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Retrieved from: Occupational Safety & Health Administration
 
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently learned of a hazardous condition that may exist in certain molded-case circuit breakers modified by a third-party rebuilder. The breakers may have an actual rating of 600 volts AC (alternating current) …

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Retrieved from: Occupational Safety & Health Administration
A needlestick or a cut from a contaminated sharp can result in a worker being infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and other bloodborne pathogens. The standard specifies measures to reduce …

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Retrieved from: Occupational Safety & Health Administration
One way the employer can protect workers against exposure to bloodborne pathogens, such as hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the virus that causes AIDS, is by providing and ensuring they use …

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Retrieved from: Occupational Safety & Health Administration
All of the requirements of OSHA’s Bloodborne Pathogens standard can be found in Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations at 29 CFR 1910.1030. The standard’s requirements state what employers must do to protect workers who are occupationally …

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Retrieved from: Occupational Safety & Health Administration
An employer must develop an exposure control plan and implement use of universal precautions and control measures, such as engineering controls, work practice controls, and personal protective equipment to protect all workers with occupational exposure. In addition, employers must …

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Retrieved from: Occupational Safety & Health Administration
Exposure incidents should be reported immediately to the employer since they can lead to infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus(HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), or other bloodborne pathogens. When a worker reports an exposure incident right …

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