Platforms

Elevated platforms are covered under OSHA’s walking/working surface standard. This section includes guidance for those working on or operating powered platforms, manlifts, and vehicle-mounted work platforms.

One defective plank was the cause of a three-story fall that killed a bricklayer.
He was part of a crew laying bricks on the top floor of a building. They had built a six-foot (1.83-meter) platform across the space between two scaffolds.
They had done everything properly, …

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Powered aerial lifts make it possible for workers to do safely all kinds of jobs once calling for a long and hazardous climb. When used incorrectly, though, these lifts take a toll in deaths and injuries.
Safety must be the first concern for anyone working aloft …

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Every year in the U.S. more than 800 construction workers die and nearly 137,000 are seriously injured while on the job.

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Retrieved from: Occupational Safety & Health Administration
Aerial lifts have replaced ladders and scaffolding on many job sites due to their mobility and flexibility. They may be made of metal, fiberglass reinforced plastic, or other materials. They may be powered or manually operated, and are considered …

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Retrieved from: Occupational Safety & Health Administration
 
Aerial lifts are often used in shipyards and boatyards when erection of staging is impractical. These boomsupported personnel platforms and bucket trucks (i.e., cherry pickers) may cause worker injuries or deaths. Boom failure, tip-over, falls and ejection may occur …

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