Platforms

Elevated platforms are covered under OSHA’s walking/working surface standard. This section includes guidance for those working on or operating powered platforms, manlifts, and vehicle-mounted work platforms.

Two bridge construction workers were injured, one critically so, after a steel-reinforced concrete support beam weighing at least 60,000 pounds fell 40 feet in Surprise, AZ.

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The disturbing increase of communication tower worker deaths in 2013-2014 spurred a review of OSHA’s Communication Tower directive. See the changes here.

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The company faces $163,240 in proposed penalties for seven repeat, 16 serious, and three other-than-serious safety violations.

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To understand OSHA fall protection rules, you need to understand the language of scaffolds and work platforms

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Prevent slips, trips and falls and avoid OSHA fines under the Walking Working Surfaces Standard

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Use this photo to train your workers on safe use of aerial lift devices

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OSHA fall protection requirements for general industry are set out primarily in the Walking-Working Surfaces standards—Subpart D. On May 24, 2010, OSHA proposed changes to Subpart D. Some of the most significant changes affect the requirements for mobile ladder stands and platforms. Here’s an overview …

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Question: Do automatically retractable rest platforms used with self-retracting lifelines meet OSHA standards?
 
Answer: Yes.
Explanation: Section 1926.1053(a)(19) says that when workers climb higher than 24 feet, there must be fixed ladders, i.e., ladders that can’t be readily moved because they’re part of a building or structure. …

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