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Fall hazards are an ongoing concern in most workplaces and include both falls from heights as well as falls from the same level. Slips, trip and falls from both categories consistently rank among the top causes of both disabling injuries and deaths in all types …

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The Model Reclassification Form below lists the information OSHA requires employers to document to reclassify a permit confined space as a non-permit space.

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The first step in complying with confined space requirements is identifying and classifying the “permit confined spaces”

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OSHA hasn’t had much to say about the Injury Illness Prevention Plan (I2P2) in recent months. But if you thought that I2P2 was going away, think again. Last week, OSHA issued a White Paper signalling that I2P2 remains very much at the top of its agenda.

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Under current rules, employers are obligated to maintain OSHA injury and illness records—the OSHA 300 and 300-A annual summary—unless they qualify for an exemption. One of the 3 exemptions set out in the regulations is for employers in industries that are generally deemed safe (Section …

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Partially exempted industries are listed by their Standard Industrial Classification system (SIC code). Use this tool to determine if you qualify for exemption.

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The Model Policy is an excellent example of an OSHA reporting policy that incorporates the proposed changes.

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The obligation to record musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) contained in the MSD recording standard (Section 1904.12) has been the subject of attention in recent months. Here’s a look at the current rules, a potentially significant case applying them and the Administration’s proposed changes.
 
Current MSD Recording Rules
Under …

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The decision tree, which comes right out of the OSHA standard, is a handy way to ensure you’re considering the right factors in determining the record-ability of injuries and illnesses.

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One of the general criteria that makes an injury/illness recordable is whether it’s deemed a “new case” (under Section 1904.6). Here’s an overview of the requirements and how to determine if an injury or illness is, in fact, a new case.
What Makes an Injury/Illness a …

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